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20130101
20130131
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
, of the conservatory theater and worked with the american diabetes association and taken care of the homeless in the tenderloin for a decade and advocate for foster children and worked around the world and for doctors without bolders in urganda and a delegation that traveled to pakistan. for 27 years i raised my children there. my elderly father lived there comfortably without a third story. i felt lucky to live in this part of the sunset and can i have the overhead? this is looking in one direction and 37 houses and two story and looking in the other direction. as you can see there is a long line of concontinuous houses that works. i believe the sponsor is disingenuous and they own other homes and both seem unoccupied for a long time. it's not the residential guidelines purpose to fasailtate their needs if they can't find a way to live together in two homes. she's the neighbors to the north and on the south she said the south didn't oppose and in fact if that group is two letters from the people at that address opposing it. i can skip that. opposition of this proposal is overwhelming
and make sure you have one at work. make sure if you are a diabetic or have a heart condition, something that you normal take have a little supply. have a storage area for this. consider this. if you have a supply kit, make sure you have one that's mobile. mobile meaning, if you have to evacuate a square mile for disaster or terrorist or anything, have it in there with you in case you are on your own for a bit. you might not be in your home. you might be somewhere else. there's a tsunami coming in. if you have kids at home what do you keep for them? make sure you keep them entertained and have food they like. the most useful tool in a disaster? scissors. if you use clothes you will be cold. [inaudible]. duct tape. many uses. you want garbage bags. line the toilet with trash bags. you want to line it, line it up use the tape, tape it around. the other bag to hold it. put a second bag in there. in a disaster you don't have to go outside you use your own bathroom close the door. you have one lined on the toilet, you take it out and tie it up. comfortable shoes. if you have one in the trunk
treatment for their heart disease or for their diabetes or their high blood pressure or their cholesterol or their hepatitis b. we actually provide group medical visits and group education classes and meeting people who have similar chronic illnesses as you do really helps you understand that you are not alone in dealing with this. and it validates the experiences that you have and so you learn from each other. >> i think it's very important to try to be in tune with the needs of the community and a lot of our patients have -- a lot of our patients are actually immigrants who have a lot of competing priorities, family issues, child care issues, maybe not being able to find work or finding work and not being insured and health care sometimes isn't the top priority for them. we need to understand that so that we can help them take care of themselves physically and emotionally to deal with all these other things. they also have to be working through with people living longer and living with more chronic conditions i think we're going to see more patients coming through. >> starting next year
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)